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Greyfield: Wavefield

greyfields:wavefields - project summary

‘greyfields’ is an ongoing audio-visual project investigating the psychogeography of commercial environments.

This latest iteration focuses on capturing - via specially-constructed induction microphones - the electro-magnetic spectra emitted by the informational, security, communication and power infrastructures which pervade the urban grid.

The visual aspect approaches the video image in its raw, base form - as a standing wave pattern of electrical energy, the transduction of light into electrical impulses being more akin to the electromagnetic apparatus of the microphone than the mechanical/chemical process of traditional film or photography.

‘greyfields/wavefields’ seeks to render that which is invisible, inaudible, hidden yet omnipresent, into something which can be contemplated. We are aware of these systems which infuse the physical structures of our metropolis, yet their ephemerality leads us to disregard the vastness, power (and related health implications) of their existence. They are, in many respects, a kind of urban ghost, clustering in and haunting our centres of financial and political dominance. As such, ‘greyfields/wavefields’ can be seen as a continuation/extension of the parapsychological investigations of EVP (’electronic voice phenomenon’ - the search for spirit communications via radio waves and the recording of silent spaces) - an investigation of what lies concealed in the ether.

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VIDEO:

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Mutek 2013
A/Visions 3 : May 31, 2013, 20:00
Greyfields: Wavefields

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MUSIC:

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Michael Trommer

Michael Trommer is a Toronto based producer and sound artist; his experimental work has been focussed primarily on psychogeographical explorations via the use of field recordings.

He has released material on an unusually diverse roster of labels, both under his own name as well as ’sans soleil’. These include Transmat, Wave, Ultra-red, and/OAR, Audiobulb, Audio Gourmet, Gruenrekorder, Impulsive Habitat, Stasisfield, Serein, Flaming Pines, 3leaves and con-v.

Michael also creates gallery-based audio installation work; He has exhibited work at Australia’s ‘Liquid Architecture’, ‘from 0 to 1 and back again’ at Kunsthalle Schirn in Frankfurt, Cordoba, Spain’s art:tech and soundLAB in Köln. His music has also been included in Dodi Nash’s ‘Listening Shell’ installation, on permanent exhibit at London’s Victoria and Albert museum.

He has performed extensively in North America, Europe and Asia,, including events with members of Berlin’s raster-noton collective, as well as the 2008 and 2013 editions of Mutek’s acclaimed a/visions series. He also regularly improvises with Toronto-based AI collective ‘i/o media’.

In 2011, Michael’s ‘ghostwood’ project was awarded a major audio arts grant from the Canada Council for the Arts.

Contact:
trommer@sympatico.ca

http://michaeltrommer.blogspot.com/
http://soundcloud.com/sans-soleil/
http://michaeltrommer.bandcamp.com/
http://www.mixcloud.com/sans_soleil/

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HTO

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Michael Trommer | HTO

The title ‘HTO’ is a reference to the chemical composition of water, as well as to Toronto’s nickname of ‘T.O.’.

The pieces on this album are composed of field recordings sourced from the city’s urban waterfront, buried rivers and vanished shorelines.

The majority of urban Toronto rests on the bed of what was once Lake Iroquois - a large glacial lake that has become what is now Lake Ontario. Many rivers still run through the urban core, but have been buried in order to aid urban development; ventilation shafts, the remains of bridges and evidence of ancient portage trails still dot the city’s landscape, serving as reminders of our geographical history.

Much of Toronto’s present-day waterfront is landfill and extends almost 1km from the originals.

horeline; it is characterized by rapid urban development (at this time, the city has more high-rises under construction than any other city in North America, many of these being built along the lakefront), and the once extensive railway corridor - now shrinking to make room for large-scale condominium developments. Offshore from the downtown core, one finds Toronto Island, now mostly parkland, but dominated (both geographically and acoustically) on the western side by City Centre Airport. Further out is the Leslie Spit, an large (5km), man-made peninsular extension of the shoreline comprised of urban rubble and material excavated during the creation of the Toronto subway system. Though it is now a parkland, its shores are still being expanded and one can find all manner of urban detritus there, including the remains of demolished office towers and factories.

The pieces that comprise ‘HTO’ are meant as a sonic exploration of Toronto’s water-related history. Many locations were revisited many times over the course of the last few years with a view to examining seasonal variations and the effects of urban expansion upon the soundscape. A particular focus has become the use of man-made resonant objects/spaces as well as the exploitation of the effect of the landscape - particularly open water and parkland - to emphasize their natural filtering effects upon the sound.

Audio was recorded using a variety of techniques and equipment, including contact, hydrophone, binaural, induction, and boundary microphones; extensive use of layering has been made in order to examine the sonic variations inherent in both the locations themselves as well as the contrasting recording techniques.
In some cases, the pieces were arranged ‘live’ in the locations where the field recordings were made - a direct response to the visual and acoustic environment.

Michael Trommer

Wavefields

Greyfields/Wavefields - project summary

‘greyfields’ is an ongoing audio-visual project investigating the psychogeography of commercial environments.

This latest iteration focuses on capturing - via specially-constructed induction microphones - the electro-magnetic spectra emitted by the informational, security, communication and power infrastructures which pervade the urban grid.

The visual aspect approaches the video image in its raw, base form - as a standing wave pattern of electrical energy, the transduction of light into electrical impulses being more akin to the electromagnetic apparatus of the microphone than the mechanical/chemical process of traditional film or photography.

‘greyfields/wavefields’ seeks to render that which is invisible, inaudible, hidden yet omnipresent, into something which can be contemplated. We are aware of these systems which infuse the physical structures of our metropolis, yet their ephemerality leads us to disregard the vastness, power (and related health implications) of their existence.
They are, in many respects, a kind of urban ghost, clustering in and haunting our centres of financial and political dominance. As such, ‘greyfields/wavefields’ can be seen as a continuation/extension of the parapsychological investigations of EVP (’electronic voice phenomenon’ - the search for spirit communications via radio waves and the recording of silent spaces) - an investigation of what lies concealed in the ether.

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